Carroll Cemetery, John B. Kidd estate

The above linked page is my write up of the Carroll Cemetery which is just off Nellie Jones Road in the Bracey area. This cemetery was part of John B. Kidd’s estate. There are no tombstones there, only field stones that mark the head and feet of the burials. I believe this cemetery dates to before 1830. The land was bought then divided between John B. Kidd’s children in very different acreage amounts. John B. Kidd is listed in the deed books as purchasing land five times. He bought land in two areas. The northern land ran partly along Hall Rd, much of which Miles Hall ended up purchasing from his wife Elizabeth Kidd’s siblings. The land south of Nellie Jones road was labeled on the estate plat as “the lower tract.” I added up all 5 purchases but there are discrepancies in numbers. John B Kidd’s estate shows a total (northern and southern lands) of about 320 more acres than I can account for him purchasing. My guess is that he inherited land in both areas.

I learned several things that interested me while trying to discover who owned the land before John B. Kidd. The first was that Samuel McKinney owned property bordering the John Griffith estate property that John B. Kidd purchased in 1841. Samuel married Elizabeth Newman, the older sister of Martha Newman. This Martha Newman married James B. Jones and they are the ancestors of most of the Jones in the Great Creek area. I thought Samuel and Elizabeth McKinney lived in Brunswick County, so I was surprised to find them living by Great Creek.

I also found it surprising that the chancery case (to divide Arimenta’s estate) said that this land was known as “The Arimenta Glover tract of land.” This land was inherited from her father, John B. Kidd, and Arimenta had been married to Robert Carroll for 18 years. Arimenta’s first marriage was to Granderson Glover, my great…grandfather. (I’m a descendant of his first marriage in Tennessee.) She was only married to Granderson 10 years before he died, yet this was known as the Arimenta Glover land.

Bracey-Blackridge area DNA mystery project

I’m working on solving some DNA mysteries that happened between 1864-1875. I’m looking for people who have taken an Ancestry.com DNA test with family tree roots in the Bracey-Blackridge area. All ethnicities. Family surnames will include, but are not limited to: Bennett, Boyd, Gray, Harper, Jones, Mabry, Mayo, Marks, Newman, Pearson, Thomas, Walker, Wright. There are many unknowns, as well as many cousin marriages. I’m helping a descendant of Missouri Jones and George Harper who has taken a DNA test on Ancestry.com. I want to ask each person if they match 1) myself, and/or 2) the descendant of Missouri and George Harper. Missouri’s mother was Jane Bennett Thomas, who was divorced but continued using her married name of Jones. George’s mother was Susan Harper. It appears both Missouri and George were born out of wedlock.

It is important for me to also know who is not related, but has taken a test. For example, I am a Jones descendant, through Alginon Gray. But I do not match Missouri Jones. This chart shows how I would not match Missouri genetically. I do not have any pink. :

There are many Jones and Thomas cousin marriages. So I will need help knowing people’s family lines before 1900. I will try the same approach I did to solve a DNA mystery on Fannie Gray’s husband’s side of the family, from 1918. There were several cousin and step-siblings in that project, as I know will be the case with this project. We will be comparing how people match George & Missouri’s descendants and how they match me. We have several unknown lines:

  1. Missouri’s father: paternal line (aqua on chart above)
  2. Missouri’s father: maternal line (brown on chart above)
  3. African American & Jane’s baby: male paternal line (orange on chart)
  4. African American & Jane’s baby: male maternal line (green on chart)
  5. George Harper’s mother: maternal line
  6. George Harper’s father: paternal line
  7. George Harper’s father: maternal line

First I will chart if people had a test, and if they match me or my grandparents. Also, if or how they match Missouri’s family. Then I will make a color-coded chart to show how closely people are related to Missouri’s family, based on centimorgan (cM) closeness.

The shapes were the paper trail. The colors were the DNA trail. If you are willing to message with me, my email address is: mecklenburgvagen@gmail.com

Previous post about this family and project.

Patterns of Moving: Before Mecklenburg

Whenever I feel stuck researching my family history, I try to think about patterns. What is the normal pattern for this family? If they did something that breaks the normal pattern, why? What is the normal pattern for that time and place? One pattern I have noticed is that people moved in groups. They joined military units or were in the local militia together as neighbors. Moves often happened for economic reasons. People moved with close family and friends to a new place, the people they knew they could depend on for a new start.

I know about several early Mecklenburg families, but cannot personally document any of my ancestors born before 1800, or know where they lived before Mecklenburg- except for one line, and that is my Newman line. James B. Jones (Great Creek area) married Martha Newman. They raised 15 children! Martha’s death record said she was born in Orange, VA. At first, I thought that was a mistake because Martha’s father, Abner Newman was in a Mecklenburg unit during the War of 1812 and married in Brunswick County, Virginia in 1792. I kept searching for a some kind of connection to Orange County Virginia.  I discovered that when Martha’s father died she went to live with her grandfather in Orange. She, her mother, and siblings who had not yet married all moved to Orange.

Martha’s grandfather William Newman was born in Essex County, Virginia. He lived where the Occupacia Creek crosses Route 17, very close to the Rappahannock River. William Thomas lived between the Newmans and the Rappahannock River. The more I read the court books, the more I start to wonder about if several of my Mecklenburg ancestors lived in Essex first. William Newman’s next door neighbors were Walkers, Thomases, Joneses, Brookes, Moseleys, Kidds,  and Grays. (Even though I know my Grays immigrated from County Armagh, Ireland in 1838). I see all those family names as neighbors to the Newmans  for 100 years in Essex County.  Because farms were failing in Essex county during the 1750’s and 1760’s, some people started to move to Caroline County and Orange County.  William Newman worked for many years for John Baylor and his wife Frances Walker who had farms in both Caroline and Orange counties. Mrs. Baylor had a brother who settled in Brunswick County, Virginia. Three Walker brothers (whose father was born in Essex), married three of Martha’s sisters. (William Newman’s grandchildren.) I know that these are common British surnames, but I can’t help wondering when I see these families as next door neighbors in Essex for 100 years, and then see these same names as close neighbors in Eastern Mecklenburg. That’s a pattern I don’t plan to ignore or think of as just a coincidence. It is true that a lot of people migrated from Isle of Wight and Surry counties to Mecklenburg, but now I am studying the early Essex (Old Rappahannock County) migration route to Mecklenburg.

This map shows the path that my Newman family traveled from 17th century  Essex county, to 1810 in Mecklenburg. When I find more connections to colonial families or where families  were before they came to Mecklenburg, I will share them here.  On the map below, I have marked landmarks closest to where William Newman, then where his granddaughter Martha Newman lived. The route displayed is the current highway/ travel route.

Old Great Creek Jones family land

Jones is one of the most common names in the world. Yet, all the Jones I’ve researched in the Great Creek area of Mecklenburg appear related. There are many cousin marriages between William Jones’ descendants. The family tree criss-crosses more than it branches out! William Jones had 1 daughter and 6 sons named in his will. A few of William’s grandchildren moved away. But the majority of William Jones’s descendants remained. Some of William Jones’s descendants still live in the same area, 200 years later!

William was illiterate. He signed “his mark”. Interestingly the will states, “Pronounced and dictated by the said William Jones”. I have not yet found a record which gives a birth date for William Jones. If he was born about 1737- his approximate year of birth according to some estimates, then he would have been about age 25 at his first marriage (name of first wife unknown) and age 55 when he married Agnes Bolling Clask. He would also have lived to be about age 81, outliving his wife Agnes and his sons Frederick and Richard. Carrol, Charles and Milbury were unmarried and without children. William B. Jones(son of William Jones) sons, James and Zachariah, were teenagers when their grandfather William Jones died.

I don’t know where William Jones was born or when he first called Mecklenburg home. The mother of William’s children is unknown. Because of that, I wonder if William was married further north and moved to Mecklenburg as a young widow? Or if the old church record marriage was just lost over time? Or if we just aren’t sure because William Jones is such a common name? William’s children are estimated to be born in the mid 1760’s, which was still in Colonial days, and about the time Mecklenburg was being established. Were the children born on the frontier of Mecklenburg? Or further north in more established areas? William married Agnes Clask in Brunswick County VA in 1792. He may have been living in Mecklenburg at that time. I do know the Great Creek Jones family was in Mecklenburg before the War of 1812 because a few of them were witnesses on the War of 1812 pension depositions. By 1820, Jones children and grandchildren lived along currently named Nellie Jones Rd (Nellie was William’s daughter-in-law) and Blackridge Rd.

I’ve made changes to traditional versions of Jones family charts, by reducing the number of children William had: William’s will (Written Jan 1818) was somewhat confusing, especially regarding his son John. Many people’s trees and charts say that Mary was William’s 3rd wife (with some charts reporting her as a daughter) because the will says “I lend to Mary 100 acres of land.” But the will never says the word “wife”; Mary is actually William’s granddaughter. The will also doesn’t say “grandchild”. John’s information gets confusing because his children’s names aren’t consistent throughout the will. In Carrol Jones’ estate papers, he calls his brother John by the name of James, listing the same children. So in my chart, he is named “John James Jones.” John’s children are the only grandchildren specifically named in the will. There is a reference to “the children” of Frederick and “the children” of Richard. William B. Jones’ 2 children are not mentioned or referenced at all. I don’t understand the value of things in Virginia in this time period, but the division of William’s estate does not appear to be equally divided between his children. John’s children are mentioned twice with land, so I theorize he is the oldest child, and was probably considered the main heir.

There were 13 slaves listed by name as part of William’s estate. I will post more about these individuals in the future, when I am able to look at more records. William’s will also includes: 3 beds, furniture, and 580 acres. The land was divided into 5 pieces. I have not yet seen any indication that Frederick or Richard inherited any land. I do know where Frederick lived and was buried. I assume that Frederick purchased his land, but am still trying to find earlier land records. The land descriptions in William’s will sound to me like his sons were already living on these parcels of land, with the will officially transferring the title to his sons.

  1. Charles Jones was given 190 acres with “Blue Spring Branch”, a creek, James Burton, Winfield Wynn, Joshua Winfield & Black’s Rd as neighboring properties. This property later went to Lieu Jones and James B. Jones.
  2. John Jones was given 90 acres bordering his brother Carrol Jones land, a creek at Douglas Plantation patch, and Joshua Winfield as neighboring properties.
  3. Carrol Jones was given 100 acres bordering his brother John, the creek at Douglas Plantation Patch down to Mrs. Wynn’s line, Jesse Taylor, & Joshua Winfield as neighboring properties.
  4. Mary is loaned 100 acres, later to be divided with brothers James and Samuel. (siblings John & Morning were excluded) Jesse Taylor, Jesse’s spring branch to where the road crosses the branch, the creek, Muston’s line, Mrs. Wynne, Carrol Jones were neighboring properties. (John’s family gets 2 parcels of land. #2 & #4)
  5. William is given 100 acres. Jesse Taylor, to where the road crosses James Jones spring branch, to the creek, Muston, on the creek to Hinton’s line, and Love as neighboring properties. “8 or 10 acres to be included at the fork of the creek to his tract.” This property might have gone to the elder son, James B. Jones, who owned 100 acres. Zachariah Jones paid off his father William’s debt, and got 210 acres at age 23! I believe that William B. Jones lived on Zachariah’s land, and that he lived by his 2 sons the rest of his life

I’ve not yet found where Carrol Jones, Richard Jones or John Jones’s 2 properties were, but I expect them to be along Great Creek. Probably in between Charles and William’s land. Richard Jones died pre-1800, 26 years before his father William died. He might not have ever owned land. Milbury was not left any land, and is not known to have married. In this time period, that likely means she was dependent on a brother. If that was the case, I wonder which brother she lived with? I also wonder if the 100 acres loaned to Mary was where William (Senior) lived?

I’ve been researching the Jones family and their land in the Great Creek area for almost 20 years. There is still much more to understand, learn and find! So far, the few possible Jones burial plots I’ve found contain only graves without tombstones. (Except for Frederick). I’ve only found a few possible Jones graves for a whole lot of people though, so I keep searching. It would be helpful to know exactly where Joshua Winfield, James Burton, Mrs. Wynn, (Mr?) Muston, and Jesse Taylor lived about 1815 to 1820. I’m also looking fo the location of “Douglas Plantation Patch near a creek”. I’m thinking the creek mentioned is Great Creek. There’s also a “Blue Spring Branch” I’ve not heard of before. Have you heard of these places? Or heard rumors of where their cemeteries are?

Hicks & Joyce family: Ireland, VA & NC

Nicholas Hicks & Margaret Sain (from Pat Ritchie)

Charles P. Hicks married Margaret Joyce in 1840. They moved from Mecklenburg, VA to Catawba, NC, where they were farmers. Children were Robert, William, Nicholas Franklin, Mary, and John Joseph. Robert and William fought in the Civil War and served under Captain Mull.  (Note from Pat Ritchie:  Nicholas told my father, John Hicks, Sr. that he served in the Civil War, but records cannot be found.) Nicholas married Margaret Elizabeth Roxanna Jane Sain on 9-1-1879 and they had seven children: Martha, b. Dec 1882; Anner Feb 1884; Ed Jan 1886; Halda Feb 1888; Bertha Apr 1890; George Nov 1893; Charles Gordon b. 1901. 

Nicholas was a farmer.  Between 1900 and 1910 Nicholas and brother John J. Hicks ran an academy, South Fork Academy, in Catawba County.

Nicholas died in March, 1927 of a heart lesion and was buried at Ebenezer United Methodist Church Cemetery, Hickory, N. C.  His wife died 3 months later and was buried beside him.

This post was written and submitted by Pat Ritchie a descendant of Nicholas & Margaret. Thank you Pat for sharing your picture and story!

DT Ridout picture & family

Dave Ridout sent me this picture to share. A cousin gave him a copy, but they aren’t sure which of the two DT Ridouts this could be. One DT Ridout is David Thomas Ridout who lived from 1820-1876. He was first married to Mary E. Thomas, a daughter of Robin Thomas and Rebecca Jones. His second wife was Rebecca Wells.

The second David T. Ridout I know about, lived from 1838-1908. He was the son of William Ridout and Calissa Barker. His uncle (his father William’s brother) was the other David T. Ridout, which I assume he was named after. This younger David was married to Mary Elizabeth Taylor, a daughter of Isaac Taylor. David Ridout and his next door neighbor John C. Jones married sisters the same day, 14 Dec 1865. They lived on adjoining land that was the women’s father, Isaac Taylor’s land. (Pre-1815 that land was part of Peter Thomas’ estate). This younger David T. Ridout is buried with his wife, daughter Lorena Ridout Kidd, and some grandchildren; on this land described, which is near the corner of Tolbert & Blackridge Rd.

  1. Place #1: An old Ridout Store in Old Bracey. Store no longer standing. Belonged to John Henry Ridout, son of Jesse James Ridout & Anna Caroline Ridout.
  2. Place #2: Ridout Cemetery. Children and grandchildren of the older David Thomas Ridout and Mary E. Thomas are buried here. Including Jesse James & Anna Caroline Ridout.
  3. Place #3: Old home of Jesse James & Caroline Ridout. Allen Tudor lived here as a young child.
  4. Place #4: David T. Ridout, the younger, was buried at this cemetery, (Tolbert & Blackridge Rd) and their old home place was near the cemetery, no longer standing.
  5. The straight road running north to south, just to the east of DK’s home and the cemetery, is Ridout Road.
  6. Note: Barker’s land
  7. (not marked) DK Ridout’s home was on 619-Nellie Jone Rd near the Rufus Kidd’s store.
  8. (not on map here, just additional info) James D. Ridout, son of William Ridout & Calissa Barker is buried at Blandford Cemetery in Petersburg. Ward: Civil War Soldiers, Sec: Virginia, Sq. Soldier, Loc: Memorial Hill, grave #97

Lorena Ridout (pictured above) was the daughter of David T. Ridout (younger) and Mary Taylor. So is Lorena the daughter of the man in the picture? Or is Lorena the great-niece of the man pictured beside her? (Her grandfather William Ridout’s brother.) (See chart above)

I discovered something else about this same family I’m very curious about. In the Richmond Enquirer Newspaper I found that William Ridout was murdered on 26 Sep 1843. Was the man murdered the brother or father of the man DT Ridout in this picture? These two articles are all I know about this story. This second article ran for two months, saying that Allison C Dugger, (male) was still at large. In deed records, my friend and I found there was an Allison C. Dugger junior and senior. One of the Allison’s was made a constable about a week before the murder. I don’t know which man was constable and which murdered William. The newspaper article does not reference the constable part at all.

Ridout Murder in 1843!

Richmond Enquirer Newspaper

William Ridout and Calissa had 3 children: David T. (possibly the man pictured), Polly and James. After William died, Calissa and her children moved in with her parents Ben Barker and Judith Jones. (source: 1850 & 1860 Census)

Have you seen this picture before, of DT Ridout? Or do you know enough about clothing and style to better estimate the time period of this picture? Do you have other Ridout pictures we can compare to Lorena and DT Ridout? I’m curious about what David is holding in his hand, and why was that important to be in the picture? Have you heard about this murder before? Or have you seen info about the conclusion of this story? If you have any further info or comments, please comment on this post. Note: Ridout is spelled both with and without an “E”, Rideout or Ridout. But Ridout Road, this picture and the cemetery don’t use the “E” so I omitted the “E” in this post.

Thank you Dave Ridout for sharing this picture and for adding to my map!